Multiuser operating system

Multi-user

Multi-user is a term that defines an operating system, computer program, or a game that allows use by more than one users of the same computer at the same time.

Multi-user software is software that allows access by multiple users of a computer. Time-sharing systems are multi-user systems. Most batch processing systems for mainframe computers may also be considered “multi-user”, to avoid leaving the CPU idle while it waits for I/O operations to complete.

Multi-User Operating System

 

multi-user operating system (OS) is a computer system that allows multiple users that are on different computers to access a single system’s OS resources simultaneously, as shown in Figure 1. Users on the system are connected through a network. The OS shares resources between users, depending on what type of resources the users need. The OS must ensure that the system stays well-balanced in resources to meet each user’s needs and not affect other users who are connected. Some examples of a multi-user OS are Unix, Virtual Memory System (VMS) and mainframe OS.

Multi-user operating systems were originally used for time-sharing and batch processing on mainframe computers. These types of systems are still in use today by large companies, universities, and government agencies, and are usually used in servers, such as the Ubuntu Server edition (18.04.1 LTS) or Windows Server 2016. The server allows multiple users to access the same OS and share the hardware and the kernel, performing tasks for each user concurrently.

 

Single-user, Multi-tasking

This is the type of operating system most people use on their desktop and laptop computers today. Microsoft’s Windows and Apple’s Mac OS platforms are both examples of operating systems that will let a single user have several programs in operation at the same time. For example, it’s entirely possible for a Windows user to be writing a note in a word processor while downloading a file from the Internet while printing the text of an e-mail message.

  • Multi-user –A multi-user operating system allows for multiple users to use the same computer at the same time and different times. See the multi-user definition for a complete definition. Examples of operating systems that would fall into this category are:

Linux
Unix
Windows 2000

  • Multiprocessing –An operating system capable of supporting and utilizing more than one computer processor. Examples of operating systems that would fall into this category are:

Linux
Unix
Windows XP

  • Multitasking –An operating system that is capable of allowing multiple software processes to run at the same time. Examples of operating systems that would fall into this category are:

Linux
Unix
Windows 8

  • Multithreading –Operating systems that allow different parts of a software program to run concurrently. Examples of operating systems that would fall into this category are:

Linux
Unix
Windows XP

 

Example Of Multi-User Operating System

 

  • Ubuntu
  • macOS
  • All linux based OS
  • Unix
  • IBM AS400
  • Windows 10

 

              Window 10 comparison with window 8 and 8.1

Windows 10 is a series of personal computer operating systems produced by Microsoft as part of its Windows NT family of operating systems. It is the successor to Windows 8.1, and was released to manufacturing on July 15, 2015, and to retail on July 29, 2015.

Top 10 New Windows 10 Features

Windows 10 won’t be launching for quite a while but we already know a lot about Microsoft’s upcoming OS. From Xbox for Windows and Cortana for desktop to a resurrected Start Menu and new multitasking tools, the new platform will offer a bevy of new features. These are the 10 best.

1) Start Menu Returns

It’s what Windows 8 detractors have been clamoring for, and Microsoft has finally brought back the Start Menu. Now, when you click on the Start button at the bottom left of the screen, you get two panels side by side, with the left column showing pinned, recently and most-used apps.

You also get a power button at the top for options such as Hibernate, Standby and Shutdown, and an all apps option a la Windows 8. The right column features a selection of live tiles that you can customize, resize and reorganize.  Not only that, but the search field at the bottom will look up related Internet results in addition to programs and files (as it did on Windows 7).

Even better, you can have the Start Menu expand to full screen whenever you want, eliminating the need for a Modern UI Start Screen.

2) Cortana on Desktop

Being lazy just got a lot easier. Windows 10 will bring Microsoft’s voice-controlled digital assistant Cortana to desktop computers, to make it easier for you to interact with your device without lifting a finger.  You will be able to search your hard drive for specific files, pull up photos from specific dates, or launch PowerPoint presentations just by telling your PC to do so.  You can even get Cortana to send an email while you’re working on a spreadsheet, making multi-tasking much easier.

3)Xbox App

You will soon be able to play any Xbox One game on your PC or tablet, with the Xbox app for Windows 10. The new operating system will support Xbox game streaming (through your home network), with improved speed and graphics performance thanks to DirectX 12 support. The app also lets you record, edit and share your fragging victories with the Game DVR feature, which lets you grab the previous 30 seconds of your game so you don’t miss unexpected wins. You’ll also be able to join your friends in games across Windows 10 or the Xbox platforms, and see your friends’ activity via Xbox Live

4) Project Spartan Browser

Forget Internet Explorer. The long-derided browser will be replaced by the newly announced Project Spartan. New features include PDF support, a reading mode that improves the layout of long articles, and a new note taking feature. The latter lets you scribble on any page and share your comments with your friends through social networks via a slide-in menu so you won’t have to leave the browser. Better yet,  Project Spartan will feature Cortana support within the browser, so she can pull contextual information from the sites you’re on to do things like navigate to a restaurant you’re looking up or pull up an upcoming flight time without having to go into your email.

5) Improved Multitasking

 

A new Multiple Desktops feature lets you run another set of windows as if on another screen, but without the physical monitor. This is similar to Apple’s Spaces feature on OS X, and helps you manage your multitude of open windows and apps. Instead of having multiple windows open on top of each other on one desktop, you can set up a whole other virtual desktop for those programs to reside in. Set up one specifically for home and leave your apps such as Netflix and Amazon open, and create another desktop for work on which you keep Word, Excel and Internet Explorer open.

With the new desktops comes a new way to keep track of your open apps on Windows 10. On the new operating system, you can either hit the new Task View button on the task bar or swipe in from the left edge of the screen to pull up a one-page view of all your open apps and files. It’s not much different from using the Alt-Tab combination shortcut on your keyboard, but this presents a convenient way for touch-oriented users to get an overview of what’s running.

Microsoft also updated its Snap View multitasking feature to let you dock windows to the four corners of your screen. While you could split your display between apps before, the number of programs you could have side-by-side was limited by your device’s screen resolution. The system will even suggest what other open apps you can use to fill up available space, a feature called Snap Assist.

6) Universal Apps

To make the transition across devices more seamless, Microsoft is introducing a new category of software called Universal Apps, which use the same code but adapt their interface to the device in your hand. The company is also bundling its own set of Universal apps with the OS, including Photos, Videos, Music, Maps, People & Messaging and Mail & Calendar, which all function the same way on tablets, phones and PCs. The content is stored and synced via Microsoft’s cloud service OneDrive so you can pick up where you left off on another device.

Some of these apps, such as Photos, are brand new. Photos will pull your images across your PC and mobile devices and organize, enhance and sync them through OneDrive. The system even detects duplicates and stores just one copy of the same image, and can automatically create good-looking albums for you.  The Mail app has also been overhauled and will now be a version of Outlook, complete with an editor based on Microsoft Word.

7) Office Apps Get Touch Support

A new version of Office apps Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Outlook will provide a touch-first interface across phones, tablets and PCs. The persistent function ribbon at the top of the apps is now an app bar that shows up only when you need it. In Outlook, you’ll now be able to delete messages from your inbox by swiping each entry to the left. Swiping to the right flags that message. The apps will look and perform the same way on a PC as they do on a mobile device for a more coherent experience.

8) Continuum

With the rise of hybrid laptop-tablet devices, Microsoft wants to make it easier to switch between either mode. The system will detect if you’ve plugged in a keyboard or mouse and switch modes for more convenient interaction. If you remove the keyboard/mouse, a notification will pop up from the task bar at the bottom, asking if you want to activate Tablet mode. When you do, you are greeted with the more touch-friendly profile. Dock your tablet into the keyboard again, and you’ll receive the same prompt, this time asking if you want to exit Tablet mode.

9)  Action Center

Windows 10 will provide a new way to look at all your notifications in one place. The Action Center appears to replace the Charms menu that slides in from the right on Windows 8 devices. It collects alerts from your device from all your apps, similar to the notifications drawers in iOS and Android. Depending on the app, you can also respond or react from this panel itself, with each notification expanding to show more actions. The Action Center also offers a quick way to toggle connectivity options and other settings such as display brightness and contrast.

10) Unified Settings / Control Panel

Instead of having two apps to control your device settings in Control Panel and PC Settings, Microsoft is making things less confusing by bringing them together in one. You’ll be able to manage your device from one place instead of hunting for a specific menu.

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